about

What is Creative Schools?

Creative Schools is a learning program developed by FORM. We use creative teaching and learning strategies to cultivate student agency, and engage students in deep learning of the Western Australian curriculum, the General Capabilities and the Five Habits of Learning: being imaginative, inquisitive, collaborative, persistent and self-disciplined.

How does the program work?

At the heart of the program is the interaction between students, teachers and creative practitioners, which takes place over an entire academic year. We partner teachers with creative practitioners from all walks of life and diverse practice backgrounds.

Together they reimagine the WA curriculum over 16 weeks during Terms 3 and 4, using the power of creativity to teach any subject selected by the school (Mathematics, English, STEM, HASS). Of course, the magic of Creative Schools doesn’t just happen overnight.

Training and professional development by global thought leaders and academic creativity experts in education, for teachers and creative practitioners, takes place in Term 1.

Throughout the year they also attend networking events, online zoom training, and workshops. Everyone is supported by the Creative Schools Team, and through a digital community where participants share their experiences and learn from one another.

Term 1
Professional
development
Term 2
Program delivery
in the classroom

Term 3
Program delivery
in the classroom
Term 4
Reflection and
evaluation

Research, Training & Evaluation

Creative Schools nurtures imagination, inquisitiveness, discipline, persistence and collaboration in young people - the ‘Five Habits of Learning’ all successful learners share. The program is built on robust international evidence that engagement in Creative Learning improves the quality and impact of education. Each year we work with a leading independent researcher, Mathilda Joubert, who extensively evaluates the impact of Creative Schools.

Why is it so important?

Research shows education is most effective when young people are actively involved in leading and influencing it, taking responsibility for their own learning and playing an active role in school life.

Creativity brings with it the ability to question, to be curious, make connections, innovate, problem solve, communicate, collaborate and to reflect critically These are the skills young people need to shape their future and make a positive impact on the communities in which they live.

Who makes it happen?

Click or tap each card to learn more about the team cultivating curiosity across WA.
Read biography
Lamis Sabra
Creative Learning Manager

Lamis manages the implementation and strategic direction of Creative Schools. Before joining FORM, she designed and managed educational programs for children and youth in disadvantaged communities across the Middle East and South East Asia. Lamis has partnered with UNICEF, UNESCO, CARE, Save the Children and the Maddox Jolie-Pitt Foundation. She holds a MA in Social Entrepreneurship (University of London) and studied International Development (McGill University, Canada), NGO management (Georgetown University, USA), Art Therapy (Barcelona) and Social Impact (INSEAD, France)

Read biography
Vanessa Bradley
Creative Schools Coordinator

Vanessa mentors participating Creative Practitioners and manages the alignment of Creative Schools’ projects to the WA curriculum. Vanessa holds a Masters in Fine Art and has had an extensive career in book publishing, working at Penguin Books (London), Raincoast Books (Canada) and Fremantle Press (Perth). Vanessa was a creative practitioner on the Creative Schools pilot program, and loved it so much she joined the team the following year.

Read biography
Paul Collard
Creative Learning Advisor

Paul leads Creativity, Culture & Education (CCE), an organisation dedicated to unlocking the true potential of young people. CCE’s programs are successful in boosting academic success, raising aspirations and improving attendance at school while engaging disengaged parents in their children’s education. Paul has co-designed and mentored creative learning programs in 23 countries across the world.

Read biography
Bill Lucas
Creative Schools Advisor

Bill Lucas is Professor of Learning and Director of the Centre for Real-World Learning (CRL). In 2017, Bill was appointed by the OECD as co-chair of the strategic advisory group for the 2022 PISA test of Creative Thinking. Bill is an academic advisor to the Mitchell Institute, the Durham Commission on Creativity in Education and the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority in Australia. Bill has authored over 40 books on creativity and education reform. Bill delivers mentorship on embedding creative and critical thinking in WA school communities, to all of the Creative Schools leaders.

Read biography
Paul Gorman
Creative Schools Advisor

Paul Gorman runs education consultancy Hidden Giants, supporting schools in reimagining their curriculum by placing creative and critical thinking at its heart. Established in 2014, Hidden Giants’ is already regarded as Scotland’s leading creative learning organisation. Paul has over 20 years of experience working in the cultural and learning sector as a freelance practitioner, project manager, lecturer, fundraiser and now strategist. He mentors Creative Schools Teachers and Creative Practitioners on teacher pedagogy, student agency and student engagement.

Read biography
Mathilda Joubert
Creative Schools Evaluator

Mathilda is the Director of Excellence & Innovation at Sheridan College. She has been a long-term advisor to the UK, the Lithuanian and the Australian governments on curriculum and assessment policy, including as researcher to the UK’s National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education, which was chaired by the late Sir Ken Robinson and advisor to the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority on creative and critical thinking. Mathilda has two bachelors and three Masters degrees (in music, languages, education, cognitive neuropsychology and business).

Who makes it happen?

Click or tap each card to learn more about the team cultivating curiosity across WA.
Read biography
Lamis Sabra
Creative Learning Manager

Lamis manages the implementation and strategic direction of Creative Schools. Before joining FORM, she designed and managed educational programs for children and youth in disadvantaged communities across the Middle East and South East Asia. Lamis has partnered with UNICEF, UNESCO, CARE, Save the Children and the Maddox Jolie-Pitt Foundation. She holds a MA in Social Entrepreneurship (University of London) and studied International Development (McGill University, Canada), NGO management (Georgetown University, USA), Art Therapy (Barcelona) and Social Impact (INSEAD, France)

Read biography
Vanessa Bradley
Creative Schools Coordinator

Vanessa mentors participating Creative Practitioners and manages the alignment of Creative Schools’ projects to the WA curriculum. Vanessa holds a Masters in Fine Art and has had an extensive career in book publishing, working at Penguin Books (London), Raincoast Books (Canada) and Fremantle Press (Perth). Vanessa was a creative practitioner on the Creative Schools pilot program, and loved it so much she joined the team the following year.

Read biography
Paul Collard
Creative Learning Advisor

Paul leads Creativity, Culture & Education (CCE), an organisation dedicated to unlocking the true potential of young people. CCE’s programs are successful in boosting academic success, raising aspirations and improving attendance at school while engaging disengaged parents in their children’s education. Paul has co-designed and mentored creative learning programs in 23 countries across the world.

Read biography
Bill Lucas
Creative Schools Advisor

Bill Lucas is Professor of Learning and Director of the Centre for Real-World Learning (CRL). In 2017, Bill was appointed by the OECD as co-chair of the strategic advisory group for the 2022 PISA test of Creative Thinking. Bill is an academic advisor to the Mitchell Institute, the Durham Commission on Creativity in Education and the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority in Australia. Bill has authored over 40 books on creativity and education reform. Bill delivers mentorship on embedding creative and critical thinking in WA school communities, to all of the Creative Schools leaders.

Read biography
Paul Gorman
Creative Schools Advisor

Paul Gorman runs education consultancy Hidden Giants, supporting schools in reimagining their curriculum by placing creative and critical thinking at its heart. Established in 2014, Hidden Giants’ is already regarded as Scotland’s leading creative learning organisation. Paul has over 20 years of experience working in the cultural and learning sector as a freelance practitioner, project manager, lecturer, fundraiser and now strategist. He mentors Creative Schools Teachers and Creative Practitioners on teacher pedagogy, student agency and student engagement.

Read biography
Mathilda Joubert
Creative Schools Evaluator

Mathilda is the Director of Excellence & Innovation at Sheridan College. She has been a long-term advisor to the UK, the Lithuanian and the Australian governments on curriculum and assessment policy, including as researcher to the UK’s National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education, which was chaired by the late Sir Ken Robinson and advisor to the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority on creative and critical thinking. Mathilda has two bachelors and three Masters degrees (in music, languages, education, cognitive neuropsychology and business).

Where are we working our magic?

Creative Schools is delivered to classrooms in primary and secondary schools.

Year on year, demand for the program grows exponentially. This map shows how far reaching the positive impact of Creative Schools is and where we’ve sparked creativity to transform education.

This is an interesting, more engaging way of learning. I wish all learning was like this."

Student
Merriwa Primary School

Let's do the maths

The reach of Creative Schools is broad and inclusive with an emphasis on facilitating learning transformation in ALL school environments, including those considered to be more challenging and/or those located in low socioeconomic areas.